Saturday, April 29, 2006

About the Conspiracy

HISTORICAL FACT:June 6, 1982, the Israeli Defense Force invaded Lebanon seeking to deal a major blow to the Palestinian Liberation Organization and Syria. Following the campaign investigators located miles of tunnels beneath South Lebanon containing Soviet war machines and documents in both Arabic and Russian. The papers revealed a plot to threaten Israel's right to exist and to launch an urban guerilla warfare scenario in the United States by way of utilizing an intricate array of terrorist networks already operating in America. They also found thousands of pounds of coffee beans.The Priory of Sion, a European secret society, was founded in 1956, rather than 1099 as some would have you believe. Parchments known as the Les Dossiers Secrets, naming numerous Grand Masters of the Priory, including Leonardo Da Vinci, were planted by the founder of the Priory of Sion, Pierre Plantard. The hoax was exposed in 1996 in a series of French books and a BBC documentary. The early Church did not recast Mary Magdalene as a prostitute to cover-up any dangerous secret. Holy Writings clearly indicates that Mary Magdalene was not a whore, but a woman that was tormented by seven demons. The sinner that anointed Jesus' feet with her tears is unnamed.Gnosticism launched a conspiracy nearly 2,000 years ago aimed at discounting Christ's divinity and challenging Christianity's teachings. Today, in search for new spirituality, the public is falling for the deception. Proponents of a federalized world government are using the conspiracy to their own end, employing mankind's longing for a new age in order to promote the Blue Prints for a World Revolution.There does exist, and has existed, an international network whose role in history is significant enough to shape our thinking, and thrust our society toward a genuine global government. Our roles have been orchestrated by the world's elitists, intended at creating the institutional framework for a world economic community. National sovereignty will be lost to international organizations. The conspiracy is designed to seize control and consolidate the four centers of power; political, economic, intellectual, and religious. It is being accomplished in the interest of creating a more peaceful, more productive, world community. The New World Order is the natural inheritor of socialist and communist enthusiasms. It will claim to be fair to the common man. It will attempt to bring peace and safety. It will be treated as a world religion. The creators of the coming global system will rule the future. By Way Of Deception, Thou Shalt Commit War.

In my book, The Leonardo Conspiracy, while the Israeli government searches for terrorists with nuclear devices hidden in the tunnels below South Lebanon, a National Security Agency historian uncovers a conspiracy aimed at launching a global economic partnership that could bring the United States to its financial knees. A coded cipher from the President of the U.S. moments before his assassination drags the historian, and a lovely Israeli Mossad operative, unwittingly into a web of intrigue and espionage. Betrayed on all sides, they must countermand a nuclear plot envisioned by the globalists, and the final key to disarming the enemy is an encryption key that activates a failsafe code hidden in the cipher sent to the historian in the beginning, and a password concealed in the name of Leonardo Da Vinci.

The Da Vinci Code is a part of the conspiracy that exists for real in our current society, as is The Jesus Papers, and all of the other books suddenly coming out in favor of Gnosticism. Fascinatingly, a lot of the conspiracy is materializing in the environmental movement. I agree that the Earth is valuable and needs be protected - - but we must also recognize that some of what Earth is going through is a part of a natural cycle. People worship the creation, rather than the Creator. "Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and Him only shalt thou serve." Matthew 4:10 Also, Paul makes this point in Romans 1:21-25, NKJV: "Although they knew God, they did not glorify Him as God, nor were they thankful, but ... ex-changed the truth of God for the lie, and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator."

In all, the latest thing is self. It's the "me" generation. Look better, live longer, and achieve these things through the power of your mind. The age in which we live has normalized this false religion of self-worship. We even have a name for it-"humanism." Thousands of years ago, God predicted this humanistic movement. It is symbolized in prophecy both as the king of the south (Daniel 11:40) and as the beast from the bottomless pit (Revelation 11:7-10). When the French Revolution fulfilled this prophecy it deified man's reason and established the foundation for the pseudo religion of secular humanism. The belief that man's reason is sufficient to answer life's most profound questions and needs, and that there is no God or moral absolutes, forms humanism's axis. This belief system has largely controlled the affairs of man from the 1790s to present. According to Revelation 11:8, it has two key characteristics-Egypt's atheistic unbelief in the true God, and Sodom's immorality.

Secular humanism's atheism and immorality have gained a strong position in the United States through the latest Gnostic movement fueled by the latest thrust of anti-Christianity attitudes fanned by The Da Vinci Code. Humanism also controls most of America's government programs, institutions of higher learning, the training of grade-school children in public schools, the homosexual movement, etc. Consequently, America is now reaping the same whirlwind of degradation that France did in the wake of its Revolution. For lack of moral fiber, the United States is unraveling at the seams.

The current epidemic of homosexuality, adultery, crime, and other debasing actions should not surprise us. The Bible states this as the inevitable result of exalting man's reasoning above God's truth. "And even as they did not like to retain God in their knowledge, God gave them over to a reprobate mind, to do those things which are not convenient; Being filled with all unrighteousness, fornication, wickedness, ... without natural affection, ... Who knowing the judgment of God, that they which commit such things are worthy of death, not only do the same, but also have pleasure in them that do them." Romans 1:28-32.
We are so busy worshipping ourselves, our accomplishments, our minds, and anything other than God, that we have doomed ourselves. Only through Christ is true enlightenment, growth, and understanding obtainable.

I agree that we must protect what is around us, but my number one priority is changing hearts by leading people to the truth of Christ - and then through their changed hearts our world will change for the better, and become a better place to live.

The world, in the search for the completeness that only God can provide, searches for spirituality and oneness wherever they can, pressing for a world that comes together in unity. This is not a new concept. The conspiracy is over two thousand years old. One way to achieve what they desire is through the economic structure of the United States of America.

In short, to achieve global unity, they're taking advantage of the American dollar crisis. There's a reduced demand for dollars on the global foreign exchange markets, partially thanks to many of the Arab nations demanding that their oil be sold under United Nations programs and to be paid in euros rather than dollars. It's a direct threat to the supremacy of the U.S. dollar as the world's reserve currency and the ability of America to fund its massive deficits. But, here's the key, in order to succeed we must completely pull out of the Middle East region. In the process the U.S. dollar is losing ground, It also plans to dissolve the sovereignty of the United States.

Tuesday, April 25, 2006

Challenging The Da Vinci Code

The upcoming movie stars Tom Hanks. It's based on the best-selling novel by Dan Brown that has already raked in tens of millions of dollars, and has caused controversy worldwide. Since the film is based on the best-selling thriller, it is being characterized as one of the most controversial movies ever made. The Da Vinci Code, opening in U.S. theaters May 19, is a Gnostic tool celebrating radical feminism, but adding to a conspiracy launched before the birth of Christ. A week before American audiences receive the opportunity to see the drama on the big screen, a documentary exposé on the novel and the movie will be shown to a national TV audience. It's called "Breaking the Da Vinci Code," and it was created for television airing May 6 at 8 p.m. on the i network, formerly PAX TV. It will be shown again May 13 at 8 p.m. and again May 26. As is The Da Vinci Code movie, this documentary is based on another popular book of the same name. The documentary, say producers, answers all the lingering questions and explodes myths perpetuated by the novel and the upcoming movie – expected to be a blockbuster hit. In the two-hour episode you will see interviews with authors and the world's leading experts in archeology, theology, art history, philosophy and science. Much of the controversy surrounding the book and the film is the proposition that Jesus was actually married to Mary Magdalene. The story line claims she had a child with Jesus – an heir that became France's royal bloodline. It further suggests Catholic secret societies hid these and many other secrets about Jesus. It supposes Leonardo Da Vinci and Sir Isaac Newton were in on the secret. Da Vinci, the book says, tried to covertly alert the world through his painting of "The Last Supper." Does Dan Brown's book, and the upcoming movie, really undercut basic Christian tenets? Is any of it true? Check out the documentary, or read THE DA VINCI DECEPTION by Erwin W. Lutzer, THE DA VINCI DECEPTION by Chuck Missler, and THE DA VINCI HOAX by Carl E. Olson and Sandra Miesel, and then draw your own conclusions. My book, LEONARDO CONSPIRACY is a fictional novel that also challenges the ideas supported by The Da Vinci Code. Keep checking my site out to find out when my novel will be available in bookstores.

Saturday, April 15, 2006

Literary Agents and the nets that snare them

After spending some time at www.absolutewrite.com/forums and meeting other newbies to the writing craft, I'm finding that a lot of you fledgling writers desire to learn more about the craft of writing, and specifically how to get an agent. I, like you, scoured the internet searching for clues that would help me further myself in this business. I live by a number of mantras, and one is that A professional is an amateur who didn't quit. However, in the search for success in the difficult business of being a writer, one must also remember that Every decision you make changes your future, so make your decisions well. In other words, a poor decision could damage the chance for a good decision later. My run-in with a bad agent taught me that one. Okay, so I am ready to give you the 411 as I know it. By the way, if you want to check out the "becoming a writer" page on my website, feel free to click the title above. It will take you there in a jiffy.

"Now, I will be honest with you, I don't think I'm an expert, or anything, but I am a lot farther along than some in the process, and I have been failing for a long time, so I know exactly what not to do. In short, I've already learned a few things the hard way. Still, since I have this blog, I figure it's the least I can do to help out a few people more green than me. Most of my research, and that's what it takes, a lot of research, came as a result of my subscription to Writer's Digest Magazine , not only because of all of the articles, but because of the publications available such as the Guide to Literary Agents, Writer's Market, and various books from the book club. Another source for information, as well as inspiration, came from another writer. He published his journal in an issue of Writer's Digest, and after reading it, I began to believe that it could happen for me too. After years of rejection letters, the light came on at the end of the tunnel, as far as I was concerned. Joe Konrath's website also has a wonderful section called, "How to Find an Agent and Sell Your Writing," as well as numerous other "Writing Tips" sections. He's been a lot of help, and you can visit his website at www.jakonrath.com. For me, most of the changes in my luck happened when I altered my attitude. I spent most of my life wishing and hoping for publication, and treated publication like it was winning the lottery. Hoping and praying and wishing and setting goals is wonderful, as long as action and attitude follows. My attitude was all wrong. Every time I was rejected I imagined the editors laughing hysterically at the unbelievable junk they'd just received. Besides, one editor told me that they received 800 shortstories a week from unpublished writers, and they were only allowed to publish one each month in their magazine from unprovens. That meant I was battling with 3,200 other hopefuls per month. As far as I was concerned, there was a conspiracy against new writers. I could not be farther from the truth. In fact, publishers love new writers. They are looking for the next untapped talent that will skyrocket their publication into the ranks with the big boys. Problem is, there are a lot of writers out there, and most of the manuscripts are junk. People think they can just sit down and write something and the editor will do all the corrections. My first mistake as a newbie was going straight to the publishers. Don't get me wrong. There are many success stories of people who hit it without an agent, but compared to those with agents, they are very few stories, indeed. Besides, an agent can negotiate better contracts, and protect your interests in ways that you would never have thought of. It's sort of like having a lawyer. You may not need one, but you're a lot better off with one. Agents, like publishers, are being bombarded with stories that shouldn't see the light of day, or works that are in genres they don't even represent. That's where some of the research comes in. Agents and publishers that represent horror are not going to accept romance novels. Christian editors want nothing to do with Mainstream Adult Fiction, and so on. Figure out what genre your completed (that's right, completed, edited, and the best product you can put out) manuscript falls under, and then find the agent that specializes in that. You don't want just any agent. You want the right agent. Someone who's been in the business long enough that they have the connections, yet someone new enough that they love new writers. And disregard that "No Simultaneous Submissions" rule. If you sent one at a time, you'd be in your grave before you found somebody. I researched like crazy and sent seven queries out. Joe, I believe, sent out twenty at a time. Another writer I've talked to sent 40 at a time. Some writers get a 40% to 60% favorable response rate, some find one in a hundred. It all depends upon the genre, the demand for work similar to yours, and your research. I sent out seven and got an agent (the one I wanted the most because they best fit my novel) out of that first group. Be warned, though, not all agents are what they seem. The first agent that picked me up was small cookies and not capable of representing me as I desired. Click at Preditors and Editors for a list of some of the problem children in the agency business. As an added note, I have written a number of articles regarding acquiring agents further down on this blog.

When it comes to querying an agent, your first query letter must be written with this in mind: The first impression is a lasting impression. You want to come across professional, and original. When I say original, that does not necessarily mean a bunch of gimmicks, and don't tell them that this is their next blockbuster, or part of a series, or it'll make a great movie. Let them decide that for themselves. My letter begins with my full name, address, phone number, and website (optional). Then I skip a line and put the date. Under that is the name of the agent (spelled correctly) and then the name and address of the agency. Then I skipped a line, and begin Dear (agent's full name spelled correctly). In the first paragraph you can start right off with a description of the work, or give them a quick bio that shows them why you are qualified to write the manuscript. My query letter changes with each book, each experience, and with each agent. I research my agents thoroughly and detail the letter with them in mind, rather than send a letter that is obviously a part of a mass mailing. Send the first five pages of your manuscript if they don't ask for more, even if the agent indicates that they want a query letter only, or synopsis only with the letter -- how are they going to know if you can write if you don't send an example? Agents won't tell you, but they would like to see a little bit of your work.
In a post on this blog on April 5, 2006 I wrote that Literary Agents remind me of creditors. Nobody wants you until someone has you, and then they all want you. Literary agents have been burned so many times by writers that write like the rejects on American Idol sing that they don't even want to see a manuscript anymore. They search for reasons to reject the unpublished writer. Don't get me wrong, literary agents want nothing more than to find the next blockbuster novelist, but after opening hundreds of letters by frogs all day, it's hard to convince them to accept you when you're a prince. Okay, let's back up a step. An agent is needed for a number of reasons. Sure, there are a few unique cases out there of authors that gain publication through unorthodox methods, but the odds are stacked against such avenues being open to you. Publishers more often look at manuscripts presented to them by an agent they trust. That is a cold hard fact. Besides, wouldn't you want a seasoned professional in your corner that knows who is buying what? An agent can also handle the money matters, negotiate for you the best deal, has connections in the industry you don't have, and can help well beyond the point of publication. Unless you are one of those rarities out there that somehow hits it big because you were in the right place at the right time with the right manuscript in your hand, you need an agent. My queries began like any other author's, a strictly carved statue that went clearly by the rules. Don't get me wrong, the rules are good and should be followed, but your query needs to have something special. Something that stands out. Something that gets an agent's attention, but it best not be a gimmick. Original, quality writing stands out. One agent indicated to me that a letter that also details a marketing plan catches their attention.

Now for the query rules: state your work's primary feature, its category/genre, credentials you have to write the book if its non-fiction, plotline or subject, and keep it concise and professional. It's your 15 second pitch. If you can't convince someone that your book is worthy in 15 seconds, or six lines of print, it may not be the blockbuster that you think it is. Oh, and thank them for reading your query, and tell them that you look forward to their response. Cordial niceties go a long way. Personally handpick the agents that you plan to query. Do your research. Otherwise your rejections will read something like, "Your manuscript is not right for our agency," or "We are not the right agent for your work." Most agencies reject 98% of what they receive. They are not being mean spirited, they are in business to make money, and a literary agent does not earn a penny until they make you a penny (hence, if they ask for money, get a different agent/some legitimate literary agents may charge duplicating costs, etc., but most postpone payment until you make money, and then take the charges from that). If they are going to stick their neck out, then they only want to represent what they believe has the best chance at publication, and a good chance at bringing in a high dollar. It's all about business, and until you treat your writing like a business, it will remain nothing more than a hobby. Don't do anything that will burn bridges with any literary agent, and don't get a bad agent that is capable of soiling your reputation before you build one. As I stated earlier, I had a bad agent, an experience of which you can read the details of in one of my past posts, and it was a year of wasted time and effort. Also, I don't know what damage it caused me in the publishing industry. Hopefully, the damage was minimal. Research, research, research. Remember: A professional is an amateur who didn't quit. Stay the course, and finish the race.

Tuesday, April 11, 2006

The Gospel of Judas - another Gnostic heretical teaching

The Gospel of Judas, an obvious Gnostic writing not consistent with the canonized New Testament, has emerged. It tells a story that makes Judas look like a hero. Judas is praised for his betrayal as it was necessary to release Christ from his human body - - a false statement since Christ's purpose was to die in our place to provide the gift of salvation. Click the title of this story to get the full story at Christianpost.com.

Wednesday, April 05, 2006

Literary Agents: Needing an Agent, Querying an Agent, Getting an Agent

Agents are an interesting sort. They remind me of creditors. Nobody wants you until someone has you, and then they all want you. Literary agents have been burned so many times by writers that write like the rejects on Idol sing that they don't even want to see a manuscript anymore. They search for reasons to reject the unpublished writer. Don't get me wrong, literary agents want nothing more than to find the next blockbuster novelist, but after opening hundreds of letters by frogs all day, it's hard to convince them to accept you when you're a prince.

Okay, let's back up a step. An agent is needed for a number of reasons. Sure, there are a few unique cases out there of authors that gain publication through unorthodox methods, but the odds are stacked against such avenues being open to you. Publishers more often look at manuscripts presented to them by an agent they trust. That is the cold hard fact. Besides, wouldn't you want a seasoned professional in your corner that knows who is buying what? An agent can also handle the money matters, negotiate for you the best deal, has connections in the industry you don't have, and can help well beyond the point of publication. Unless you are one of those rarities out there that somehow hits it big because you were in the right place at the right time with the right manuscript in your hand, you need an agent.

My queries began like any other author's, a strictly carved statue that went clearly by the rules. Don't get me wrong, the rules are good and should be followed, but your query needs to have something special. Something that stands out. Something that gets an agent's attention, but it best not be a gimmick. Original, quality writing stands out. One agent has indicated that they prefer, whether asked for or not, that at least the first five pages should always be included with the query. Another has indicated to me that a letter that also details a marketing plan catches their attention.

Now for the query rules: state your work's primary feature, its category/genre, credentials you have to write the book if its non-fiction, plotline or subject, and keep it concise and professional. It's your 15 second pitch. If you can't convince someone that your book is worthy in 15 seconds, or six lines of print, it may not be the blockbuster that you think it is. Oh, and thank them for reading your query, and tell them that you look forward to their response. Cordial niceties go a long way.

Personally handpick the agents that you plan to query. Do your research. Otherwise your rejections will read something like, "Your manuscript is not right for our agency," or "We are not the right agent for your work." Most agencies reject 98% of what they receive. They're not mean, they are in business to make money, and a literary agent does not earn a penny until they make you a penny (hence, if they ask for money, get a different agent/some legitimate literary agents may charge duplicating costs, etc., but most postpone payment until you make money, and then take the charges from that). If they are going to stick their neck out, then they only want to represent what they believe has the best chance at publication, and a good chance at bringing in a high dollar. It's all about business, and until you treat your writing like a business, it will remain nothing more than a hobby.

Don't do anything that will burn bridges with any literary agent, and don't get a bad agent that is capable of soiling your reputation before you build one. I had a bad agent, an experience of which you can read in one of my past posts, and it was a year of wasted time and effort. Also, I don't know what damage it caused me in the publishing industry. Hopefully, the damage was minimal. Research, research, research.

I have more information about getting a literary agent on my website. Click the title of this post to take you there. Good luck, stay persistent, and remember: A professional is an amateur who didn't quit.

Stay the course, and finish the race.